Creeping Fig

Creeping Fig

ORIGIN

The Creeping Fig (Ficus pumila) is an evergreen vining plant that is so-named for the way that it can climb and cling to almost anything! For this reason, it's sometimes also called the Climbing Fig.

This plant is native to eastern Asia but has also since been naturalized in some areas of the United States, and is found all over the world as a popular houseplant.

You can recognize a Creeping Fig by its tiny heart-shaped leaves: these don't tend to exceed around 1 inch (2.5 cm) long. In fact, the Latin pumila actually translates to 'dwarf', referring to the small size of this plant's foliage.

Creeping Fig 2

CARE

Creeping Figs need plenty of bright indirect sunlight in order to thrive, although they don't like full sun. Try to provide yours with around 8 hours of sunlight per day. If your home is particularly sunny, you can diffuse harsh light by moving your plant a little further away from the window and / or placing a sheer curtain between your Fig and the light source.

Without enough light, these plants may start to drop their leaves and their growth rate will slow down significantly, which isn't ideal if you're trying to encourage it to climb!

As they are tropical plants, they're accustomed to warmth and humidity. Most indoor environments are too dry for tropical plants, so you'll need to boost the humidity by regularly misting your Creeping Fig. You may also want to place it on a pebble tray in order to further increase the moisture in the air around your plant.

Creeping Fig

OTHER

If you're looking for a versatile vining plant then the Creeping Fig is an excellent option. They grow more quickly as they mature and will eagerly climb most surfaces. Unlike some other more sensitive climbing plants, they can also withstand fairly aggressive trimming, so you can shape it to your liking.

Note, however, that Creeping Fig is unfortunately toxic to both humans and animals so may not be suitable for homes with kids and / or pets. Make sure to always keep it well out of reach.